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Redundant Department of Redundancy, part 12.

Or: I Went to Read This Community Member’s Blog. What She Wrote about RHEL and Fedora Blew me Away!

Sorry about the clickbaitism. But seriously, after returning from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 release festivities this evening I planned to write a blog to the Fedora community about how RHEL and Fedora are intertwined. How Fedora is the cradle of platform innovation that Red Hat relies on to build RHEL and thus to serve as a foundation for many other products. How the community helps select and cultivate technology and prevent Red Hat from investing a ton of resources to make something no one wants.

Then I saw that Robyn Bergeron has already written everything to be said. Which illustrates several points:

  1. Properly empowered, motivated, and ambitious community is faster than individual effort.
  2. Robyn is awesome.
  3. There is no post about Fedora into which we can’t somehow reference His Meatiness.

Need I say more? No. Go read Robyn’s post if you haven’t already. [Mic drop]

On the wing, part 34.

I’m up in Westford at the Red Hat offices for some departmental events this week. It’s always fun traveling to the office and seeing coworkers and friends I normally only hear (or see online in text form). It does, however, eat mightily into my ability to be online in Fedora and interacting with friends, teammates, and contributors there. I’ll be up here through Thursday afternoon and then flying back home. So if you reach out to me but I’m a little slow to answer you in IRC or email, my apologies, and I’ll catch up as soon as I can!

Transitions.

I just saw Robyn’s post on change and her intention to retire as Fedora Project Leader.

I’m really happy, Robyn, that you’ve been such a big part of Fedora for these years. Whatever comes next, you have huge thanks from me and I know from many others in the Fedora community for your service and spirit. Thanks for including the community in everything you do, and I’m looking forward to working with you in your next role!

Sub Hub hubbub.

Have you seen Máirín Duffy’s post on the Fedora Design team’s next-generation design for the Fedora Project website? It’s a brilliant design based around the idea of a “sub hub.” These screens help customize the website to fit different sub-communities, initiatives, teams, or projects.

Máirín published this post with the design mockups a few weeks ago and they’re still open for feedback. I love the concept and the mockups, and the way it brings the site a little closer to the functionality people expect for interaction in other communities. The sub hub design offers a sites not just for promotion, but also for bringing people together for communication and information.

I’m sure the Design team will move forward at some point to bring these concepts into reality. But before they do, I know they’d appreciate hearing from community members. Even just offering feedback that “This is awesome!” is useful, so the designers know there is a solid mass of people who like the work. You can visit the site here to offer your constructive comments.

If you don’t, that’s OK too! Just be polite and specific in your comments. Rather than saying how to fix something, talk about why something doesn’t work for you. Designers are good at figuring out how to solve usability problems once they know more about the effects on the user. Those of us without a lot of design and usability experience often suggest solutions that seem like they’d work, but really might cause more problems for other users. So it’s best to concentrate on symptoms.

So if you haven’t checked out the post and offered some constructive feedback, please feel free. I’m really looking forward to seeing how things move forward with these designs and hope you’re excited about them too.

If you’re excited enough about the work to get involved and help, the Design team would love your contributions. There’s also more information about how to contribute here. There are several repositories set up where you can test existing ideas, change them with your own, and contribute changes back to the team using a pull request. Getting involved is easy, and the Design team is famous for their friendliness and willingness to help people get started contributing. So don’t be afraid to jump in!

Irssi in Terminal on GNOME 3.12 in Fedora 20.

A lot of people I know like running the Irssi IRC client in a terminal, whether in a terminal multiplexer like tmux or GNU Screen. Me too!

I also love running the latest GNOME releases. So when GNOME 3.12 was released and available for Fedora 20, I followed these simple instructions, courtesy of Fedora Magazine and Ryan Lerch, to install it on my system.

I discovered a new feature in the GNOME Terminal is that keys Alt+1 through Alt+0 are mapped to allow you to quickly navigate to the first ten tabs in Terminal. This is super-useful, but because those keys also happen to map to the shortcuts in Irssi for switching to your first ten IRC windows, I couldn’t use them in Irssi. Since I use that function a lot more often, here’s how I fixed it:

  1. Open a GNOME Terminal, and from the quick menu in GNOME Shell’s top bar, choose Preferences.
  2. Under the Shortcuts tab, locate the Tabs list.
  3. For each shortcut from “Switch to Tab 1″ to “Switch to Tab 10,” click the shortcut to select it. Then click the entry under Shortcut Key. Hit the Backspace key to remove the existing shortcut.

Now you can use your Alt key combinations as before in Irssi. Have fun!

 

DevConf.cz, days 1 and 2.

DevConf.cz day 1, Friday.

Friday was the first day of sessions at DevConf.cz, the biggest and best Czech open source event by developers, for developers. The event was packed, with over 900 attendees even before the weekend started!

First up at 9:00 sharp was Tim Burke’s keynote about how Red Hat sees the IT market, specifically Linux and open source technologies. He covered how the various pieces of cloud, applications, storage, and platform fit together. It was pretty breakneck because there wasn’t a lot of time until the sessions started, but well observed and thoughtful. It’s clear the technologies built by people at this conference will set the pace for the future. The market has placed its bets on Linux and open source, and now it’s on us to deliver!

Langdon White followed with a story of startups. He covered how the tradeoffs between agility, stability, and maintenance can be mitigated by Software Collections. Software Collections allow IT groups to add stacks on their platform without affecting the deployment itself, while meeting more needs for developers and users.

Alex Larsson did a talk to a packed room (the biggest at the conference, no less!) on Docker, the open source container engine rapidly sweeping the community with its speed and flexibility. Fedora is rapidly developing a great grasp of Docker, and you can already install it on all supported Fedora releases. Obviously Red Hat has taken a huge interest in Docker too, so it’s no surprise the talk was SRO.

I went to Colin Walters’ session on OStree, a new way of distributing Linux operating systems. I found this session incredibly compelling, and I hope we look seriously at OStree in Fedora because of the problems it solves. There are clearly some issues that still need to be worked out, but Colin is up front about them, and he’s motivated and eager to collaborate with people to solve them. He’s truly one of the good guys of free software and I enjoyed this talk a lot.

I also attended Ondrej Hudlicky’s session on software usability, which was entertaining but also thought-provoking. A lot of what goes into making good software we either take for granted or completely miss. It’s so easy for software to suck when you don’t start by thinking about what the user is trying to do, and making that easy. Although the slides were quite dense, Ondrej did a great job explaining the concepts and why they were important.

I also attended sessions on DNF’s SAT solver, caught a bit on static analysis that went way over my head, and saw Richard Hughes’ session on GNOME Software. DevConf.cz is so packed with content, it’s impossible to see more than about half of what you’d like. There’s so much more content for Java folks, low-level network and hardware hackers, and kernel jockeys that it makes your head spin!

In the evening I went with a bunch of folks to get pizza at the hilariously named Pizzeria Al Capone down the street. The food was quite good, and the beer plentiful as we swapped stories and jokes. We had people from all over the globe at the table so it was a great night. Afterward we retired to the famous bowling bar in the basement of the Hotel Avanti. And of course, more beer and stories. I turned in rather late, around 1:00am, but in good shape for the next morning.

DevConf.cz day 2, Saturday.

Started out the day early again, with a 9:00am session on Cockpit. Cockpit is a new Linux server management user interface that beautifully fits the look and feel of modern desktops. It’s also has already grown a lot of capability including user and storage administration. This is a great way for us to break away from clunky and individually deprecating system-config-* tools. Instead we can move to a tool that’s more flexible, extensible, and network transparent for scalability.

Following was a talk by Russ Doty on security concerns in platform and application development. It was mainly general but made some good points about where threats usually come from (hint: not Igor the evil state-funded hacker).

Of course, no DevConf.cz event would be complete without a rapid-fire presentation from Lennart Poettering, and this year was no exception. Lennart covered kdbus, a new kernel implementation of IPC based on the excellent D-Bus. Kdbus is on its way into the kernel and will make Linux even slicker, starting with early boot and extending all the way to latest shutdown.

I also sat in on Ric Wheeler’s excellent presentation on Persistent Memory, which is next generation storage technology. Ric covered some of the challenges in supporting new types of storage in the Linux kernel, and the relative strengths and weaknesses of each.

Afterward, I went to lunch with Ralph Bean and Pierre-Yves Chibon from the Fedora Engineering team. With us were Patrick Uiterwijk and folks from Red Hat that work on infrastructure and tools for RHEL and JBoss engineers. We discussed some areas of potential collaboration, including a messaging bus for Red Hat Bugzilla. That could be an awesome new input for contributor data.

Then all the smart folks went off to find better broadband at the hotel to pore over some code together. Since I wouldn’t have been much help, I went back to the conference to catch Simo Sorce’s talk on Kerberos.

Following Simo, Dan Walsh talked about secure Linux containers. As always he was tremendously entertaining. Dan joked about how he’s been a big proponent of libvirt-sandbox for secure container support, but recently “got religion” about Docker. I hope this was taped because it was really informative. No wonder Dan’s consistently rated as a top speaker at the Red Hat Summit. (Note, you can still register for the event; I’ll be there in San Francisco too!)

Next Kyle McMartin talked about the pleasure and pitfalls of porting the Linux kernel to new architectures (hello, aarch64!). I admit a lot of this went over my head, but Kyle told some funny stories about stalking weird bugs in test suites exposed by porting. At least I think they were funny. Or rather, I think some people thought they were funny, since they were all laughing. I don’t understand kernel people, but they’re mostly lovable, and many of them have awesome beards.

Finally, I saw a talk on Arduino Yún. This model includes a small, embedded Linux computer that you can make do all sorts of cool things with the built-in sensors and other capabilities. The talk made me wish I had more spare time to spend on learning how to do hardware tinkering. Where’s my time machine?

I bowed out of the lightning talks (even though some of them looked awesome) so I could drop my bag at the hotel before the night party at Klub Fléda, a sort of warehouse-y bar/music club nearby the conference venue. With beer beckoning, it’s time to relax a bit with friends and colleagues!

Tomorrow there will be Fedora focused sessions, so I’m really looking forward to that. More later…

PulseCaster 0.1.10 released!

Today I released PulseCaster 0.1.10 with some under the hood improvements:

  • Switch from GConf to GSettings, and include schema file
  • Providing appdata for GNOME Software
  • Provide hidden “audiorate” key for 44.1/48 kHz selection
  • Complete GObject introspection switchover, eliminating excess dependencies and fixing bugs (RHBZ #1045717)
  • Automatically provide .ogg filename extension in standard mode
  • Additional translations

I’m planning some UI improvements for this little podcasting utility. I’m also hoping to do significant code refactoring for 0.2, tentatively scheduled for late spring/early summer. I’m also thinking about moving the central development repo to GitHub, since that’s where a lot of other Fedora incubated projects have migrated.

Of course, updated packages are coming shortly for Fedora 20.

PulseCaster lets you record interviews with simplicity. It pulls audio from two sources via PulseAudio, then mixes them into an Ogg Vorbis file for you. There’s also an expert mode that allows you to lossless audio in WAV format, and mix the audio yourself with post processing. For example, you could interview someone via a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) application, then include the interview in your podcast.

I used a little time between sessions (and during one session where I was completely in over my head) to push this out. It was nice to work on some free software of my own at a conference for developers! Hope you enjoy the new PulseCaster release.

DevConf.cz 2014 begins!

I’ve been at Red Hat’s Czech office in beautiful Brno this week. That means lots of meetings, lots of email and conversations, and lots of good beer. :-) But the best part is this weekend’s big event, the Developer Conference event.

This is one of the biggest open source events in the region, and it’s all organized and held by developers and engineers, for developers and engineers. There are hundreds of people here from across the globe, including plenty of folks from Red Hat but also upstream and downstream contributors from many other companies and volunteers as well.

There is so much good content happening at this conference, I’m not sure how I’ll get to see even half of what I’d like to. But as we like to say, it’s a good problem to have. Stay tuned to the DevConf.cz site for proceedings and links to recordings.

Joyous holidays and peace on earth.

Sorry to post this a day late for some Christmas celebrants. Hopefully you will have had such a wonderful holiday that you can forgive the tardy good wishes!

Wherever you are in the Fedora community, and whatever holiday you may or may not celebrate: I wish you a joyous season and the best and most successful possible 2014. May you have peace and help spread goodwill to all, whether through free and open source software or in other ways. Happy holidays!

Congratulations, Fedora, on your 20th release!

Today is a big milestone for all my friends in the Fedora ProjectFedora 20 is released!

So to Robyn and all contributors across the entire project — congratulations on a job well done. I can’t wait to see what you come up with next!

What are you waiting for? Christmas is here early, go get it!

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