Tag Archives: gnome shell

A fun day… for some hacking.

Over the course of the day, I:

  • Tweaked the package complement on my workstation where last night I did an installation of the Fedora 15 pre-release tree
  • Identified some weirdness in my local Eclipse environment and got things in better shape for later work
  • Got a good start on some user documentation for PulseCaster
  • Took my daughter to the skate rink, and managed to skate for at least a little while before realizing I was having a rough time because my kingpin bolts are just way too freakin’ tight
  • Figured out how to adjust said kingpin bolts and made a note to take care of that before next week
  • Took my son out for some errands and lunch — a nice trip and a good chance to exercise my patience muscles
  • As a reward, bought some beer and a couple decent malbecs
  • After returning home, cleared out some obsolete packages hanging around in Bodhi and begging for death
  • Built and pushed a new update of PulseCaster to fix some bugs
  • Built and pushed a refreshed upstream version of xmlstarlet
  • Played with the dog
  • Came back and turned up a French trance station I got into recently (for some reason, monotonous, non-vocal electronica seems to help me work more efficiently… probably since there are few lyrics to listen to and digest mentally)
  • Went through some email to reduce backlog for Monday
  • Triaged a crummy gnome-system-monitor bug affecting people with more than 4 CPU cores (like me)
  • Had dinner with the family (Eleya made a fabulous corned beef, first timer but it was pretty much perfect!)
  • Came back to the desk to find that the superhuman Matthias Clasen had fixed the gnome-system-monitor bug in question, and built and pushed an update out
  • Installed said update with many thanks to Matthias, tested, and provided feedback

So of course, my definition of hacking is not nearly what some of my colleagues manage daily. But I feel like attacking some of this stuff on weekends and working on my own GNOME-ish projects are starting to give me a better fundamental understanding of some of the plumbing at work in the desktop. And of course, it gives me a wh0le new appreciation for it as well. I’m now rocking GNOME 3.0 pre-releases on both my main systems here at home, my laptop and my big workstation, and loving it.

I’ve contributed a few bug reports and to a small portion of the GNOME 3.0 user documentation for this release. It was lots of fun and made me feel connected with the release process for something I use every day that will be an intrinsic part of Fedora 15 when it arrives. It’s a great feeling to be just cranking on some little bits to help others, and just as much as ever, I know that if everyone does the same, free software has a future that is even brighter than the (already well-lit) present.

Eager beaver, no. 38.

I was really eager to get my laptop onto the branch that will become Fedora 15. A recently uncovered bug (possibly in glibc), along with another unrelated problem (in pygobject?), are preventing installs via the nightly composed ISO images of the pre-release. So if you’re on Fedora 14, and want to get on the new branch, you could do this:

  1. Back up your data and at least your /etc directory. You never know what you might wish you’d kept!
  2. Also run the following command to save the names of your installed packages: rpm -qa –qf ‘%{NAME}\n’ > /home/rpmnames-old.txt
  3. Download the Fedora 15 Alpha release, Desktop Live spin, in your choice of 32- or 64-bit, and install. In a moment you’ll update everything.
  4. After you start up and run through the normal setups, don’t bother logging in at the GUI yet. Hit Ctrl+Alt+F2 to switch to a text terminal. Login as root, or else use sudo with the following commands.
  5. Install any -release type repository RPMs you may want. I keep copies of these hanging around for just such occasions.
  6. Get the names of the newly installed packages: rpm -qa –qf ‘%{NAME}\n’ > /home/rpmnames-new.txt
  7. Run: yum –skip-broken install `diff -u /home/rpmnames-old.txt /home/rpmnames-new.txt | tail -n +4 | grep ‘^-‘ | cut -c 2-`

Note this is not a perfect solution. Releases change, and some packages may not be available in the new release that were in the old one. You may want to rerun steps 6 and 7 a couple days later if there are any broken dependencies that foil you from installing everything you wanted. Or alternately, you might want to stick in a step 6.5, which runs a few yum groupinstall commands to make step 7 shorter. This isn’t a panacea, it’s just a quick way to get up and running if you want to try out the new hotness but are stymied by the bugs listed above.

And of course, you could just download the entire Alpha DVD and point it at  so you won’t have to twiddle as much afterward; quite a few services that run by default in a DVD install, like sshd, aren’t necessarily enabled by default in an installation from the Live image. The above is just a quick way to get started if you know you’ll be doing further installation testing or other hackery later anyway. And it will give you a good flavor for the awesome new GNOME environment.

What if you want recapture your user account and password? Just refer back to your backup you made. Do not simply restore it over the new /etc files. You could really get hosed that way. Instead do something like this. I’m going to assume you only have a couple of users on your system, starting with userid 500 per normal:

mkdir /tmp/restore && cd /tmp/restore
tar xf /path/to/etc-backup.tar.gz   # Got backup?
for i in $(grep ':50[0-9]:' etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1); do
  for f in passwd shadow group gshadow; do
    grep ^$i etc/$f >> /etc/$f
  done
done

Here’s something I also recommend: move your user’s ~/.gconf directory to a backup before you login the first time. Try the spiffy new GNOME 3 out in its default settings. If you need to tweak or restore, you still have the old settings to which you can refer. But it’s worth trying everything as it was intended out of the box. I’m totally excited to run the pre-release so I can rock the new GNOME Shell. Pretty soon I’ll start working on a new branch of PulseCaster that will use the new PyGObject available in Fedora 15, and maybe a few of the cool new GTK+ 3 bits I’ve seen might be helpful in the  new UI.

Enjoy!

GNOME Shell tryout.

I’ve been using the GNOME Shell preview available in Fedora 12 this week and I’m really enjoying it. I was testing out some candidates for updates to the free drivers for my ATI Radeon HD4850 (and the stuff that went with them) already, and decided to see what happened when I picked GNOME Shell.  At F12 release time, my graphics card wasn’t quite ready for GNOME Shell use. But now I get the whole kit and kaboodle!

The free drivers for both ATI and NVidia cards have come so far in just 2009. But the fact that out of the box I can get kernel mode setting on so much new hardware, and also 3D acceleration on a new card like mine, is just phenomenal. My hat is off to the guys in both projects working on truly free software drivers for today’s video hardware, among them Fedora and Red Hat’s own Dave Airlie and Ben Skeggs. Bonzer!

Anyway, back to GNOME Shell.

My favorite feature is the application search feature. Since I’m often on the keyboard already, I don’t have to switch to the mouse, or hit a bunch of arrow keys, to pull up another app I need. Say I’m in Firefox, and I want to bring up my gEdit text editor. I can just hit Alt+F1, the normal key combination for the main menu even in current GNOME. Then I type g, e, d and by that time gEdit comes up because that locates gEdit as a unique word in its name or description. Then I hit Enter and up it pops. Nice!

The new controls for selecting among multiple running application instances, or applications across desktops, through the Alt+Tab keycombo are superb — and very easy to read, even for my tired old eyes. Effectively rearranging my desktops to put the apps I want where I want them is a snap, too. The taskbar is now down to a single bar on top, and visually it no longer even draws attention to itself because of its black color. I think that GNOME Shell has probably helped me eke out another 2-5% productivity out of my day, just eliminating time-wasting aspects of the standard GNOME 2.x interface.

The one thing I worry is that I’m missing out on some power keystrokes out there to do cool things. Is there some reference out there for under-the-hood goodies, or a way a non-programmer like me can learn how to make some?