Category Archives: FredLUG

Posts concerning FredLUG

Contributing to Pagure made easy.

I don’t get as much of a chance these days to do things like patches or other technical contribution. But I had some time free the other day and used it to stick my hands directly into a cool project, Pagure (pronounced roughly “pag-yOOR,” or listen here). You may have read about Pagure in this Fedora Magazine article a few months back.

It was tremendously easy to get Pagure, fix a bug, test the fix, and contribute it back (see my pull request here). I specifically looked for “easyfix” bugs, since I knew I didn’t have a lot of time to spend to help. So I decided to work on this issue, a button showing up when it shouldn’t.

First I forked the repo in Pagure. Then I cloned my new fork, and set it up as documented in the README. In the clone, I checked out a new branch using the issue number as a name, issue839.

To track down the fix, I ran the app locally and duplicated the error. I looked at the CSS style containers for the button and some of the surrounding elements. Using that information, I did a text search on the code to find the file that was generating the button. Then I simply applied some logic to find the fix for the problem, even though I wasn’t really familiar with the code involved.

Thankfully Pagure has a test suite, so I could also check that my fix didn’t break any of the tests. Then I committed and pushed my changes, and made a pull request using the button in Pagure’s web page.

I also learned something useful. Since I forked the repo to do my fix and make a pull request, if I force-pushed changes using git to my branch from which I made the pull request, the pull request was automatically updated with the changes! This is probably expected by people who do this all the time, but since I’m new at it, I was excited.

Bugs like this are something that just about anyone with a small amount of beginning programming skill could fix. Pagure even has other bugs like this waiting for people to handle. Maybe one of them is waiting for you! 😉

Flock 2015 thoughts.

Getting started at Flock

Like everyone on the Fedora Engineering team, I was in Rochester for the Flock conference last week. After several flight delays on our direct flight from DCA to Rochester, Justin Forbes, Ricky Elrod, and I finally arrived a little after 9:00pm — about four hours late. Thankfully Josh Boyer came to pick us up at the airport.

Flock had a team of organizers within OSAS (and Josh also assisted throughout). As a former FUDCon organizer, though, I know the value of extra hands showing up to do work. Since old habits die hard, I showed up expecting to help out behind the scenes. That means I didn’t get to see a huge amount of content I was personally interested in. But in return hopefully everyone had a smoother Flock experience, especially speakers.

When I arrived, I reported to Tom Callaway, Ruth Suehle, and Josh. They got the conference rooms opened, and I helped set up the speaker workstations. We worked pretty late, well after midnight. Things were looking a little bleak at that point, with execrable network bandwidth, no projectors, no screens, and no audio for the ballroom.

Fears and worries abate

Nevertheless, the next morning Josh and I got up early and grabbed coffee at nearby Tedward’s. This place was a godsend, although their 7:00am opening time forced us to walk around a bit until we could get in.

We went down to do some additional setup. The organizers had worked with Remy DeCausemaker to get a bunch of loaner projectors from RIT so we’d be ready for the first sessions at 10:00am. (EDIT: According to Remy, Tim Duffy and Dan Schneiderman are the heroes of this particular day; see comments below.) So at least our speakers would be in OK shape. I helped Josh and Tom get everything ready in those rooms, while Ruth made sure registration and other logistics were under control. I missed Matthew Miller’s keynote, but I’d seen at least some of the material previously.

After lunchtime, things continued to drastically improve. The rental projectors showed up, along with small screens for each room and big speakers for the ballroom. The wireless internet improved quite a bit when a switch flip occurred due to our conference starting up. (It was dismal Tuesday night!) We had all the speakers trained on how to record their talks locally, to get around the constrained network bandwidth.

Suddenly things were looking up! Not surprisingly, the Fedora Engineering team dinner that night at The Old Toad was much more enjoyable. Since I wasn’t overly worried about the conference experience for the speakers and attendees any longer, it was easier to relax and enjoy the company of the team. I was so happy that we were able to get together in one place, since we really only get to do that once a year. (Incidentally, our friend Stephen Smoogen was absent from Flock due to family commitments — we missed you, Smooge!)

Fedora contributors at Flock gather at Victoire for dinner
Fedora contributors at Flock gather at Victoire for dinner

I continued to monitor speaker rooms most of Wednesday and Thursday. I managed to make it to a couple sessions where I wasn’t sure there would be any senior Fedora leadership around. For example, I attended the Fedora Magazine session by Chris Roberts as well as most of the Fedora Hubs session by Máirín Duffy and Meghan Richardson.

I attended and loved Major Hayden‘s (of Rackspace fame) Thursday keynote on fighting impostor syndrome. It was one of the most practical that I’ve seen on this topic. I feel impostor syndrome is just a fancy way to refer to insecurity, a common trait for conscientious people. But that doesn’t make the strategies Major outlined any less useful or thoughtful. He gave a great talk — engaging and humorous without diluting the material. If you have a chance to invite him to a conference to speak, definitely do so!

I gave my own talk on Remote Ninjutsu on Thursday afternoon. The slides for the talk are here, although the video will be more useful for context. All the Flock 2015 videos are supposed to be available at some point in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned for announcements about them.

The Thursday night social event at the Strong National Museum of Play was fantastic. It was a great way to blow off steam and enjoy the company of fellow Fedorans. I’m not sure how the organizers managed to find such a perfect venue!

Workshops and Flock wrap-up

On Friday I enjoyed the keynote by Jon Schull of eNable, the community that is flipping the script on prosthetics provision through 3D printing. It was a very moving look at how people are applying open source to make the world better for people in need.

Then the workshops beckoned. Now that I’d finished my Flock duties helping speakers and attendees, I was able to attend several sessions that were relevant to me personally, including the Fedora/CentOS rel-eng joint session, and my own on revamping the Flock software stack.

Once again, the Friday night social event at the George Eastman House was marvelous. It was a beautiful, grand mansion and the tour was quite interesting. I’d love to go back there sometime to see the exhibits I missed!

The music parlor in the George Eastman House
The music parlor in the George Eastman House

Flock conferences are always especially great for their hallway track. So many discussions can be had or progressed that way with high bandwidth. The challenge is always to move that discussion to a transparent context if it involves people not present, though. I’ve been seeing many trip reports from people’s blogs about Flock, and resulting list discussions, so I think that process is well underway.

Of course, that means Flock is a very engaging event. It takes a lot of attention and brainpower to shift focus for all those conversations! As a result, by Saturday afternoon I know I was fairly exhausted — in a good way, though. Several other people I know felt likewise, and commented on how well the conference had gone. In fact, I heard a number of comments that this was the best Flock, and even Fedora premier event, yet. The OSAS folks deserve special recognition for pulling off a fantastic conference.

Sunday started with a couple meetings, including with Matthew Miller and Jan Ku?ík, our new Fedora program manager. Then, after seeing a few other friends and colleagues off, I got to the airport. I relaxed in a lounge over beers with Kevin Fenzi, Jan Zeleny, and Stephen Tweedie, before we went to our respective flights. Then after a quick flight home, it was the usual “fun” making my way down I-95 from the airport to home. Monday morning was right around the corner…

Here’s to another great Flock, and to doing it again next year!

Flock attendees wind down after the conference ends... with more hacking!
Flock attendees wind down after the conference ends… with more hacking!

PulseAudio is still awesome.

PulseAudio is an indispensable part of my Fedora Workstation. While PulseAudio may have detractors, my experience has been all good. Most sound problems I’ve seen come down to one of the following:

  • Bad drivers at a lower layer (not PulseAudio’s problem)
  • Bad hackery in the distro (ohai *buntu)
  • People parroting years-old Internet “wisdom” (does that happen?)

But in a well-integrated system, PulseAudio is awesome. That’s definitely the case with Fedora Workstation. That includes Fedora 22, which is what I’m using now.

Meetingpalooza

I’m attending a number of conference calls this week. Lots of them. The last two days have been eight hours of meetings. For example, today I’m at a Fedora Hubs workshop with fellow community members. I usually use my laptop to attend these conference calls. I use it with a USB headset attached. But having a headset on for that long is uncomfortable.

I also have a desktop computer in my office hooked to a big speaker set. So I use PulseAudio to route sound from my conference calls to those speakers. Now I don’t have to wear a headset to listen in.

I do this using the paprefs and pavucontrol utilities. I find these utilities very useful for more audio control. I can watch and move streams, all though an easy, comfortable GUI.

My home office setup, courtesy of PulseAudio.
My home office setup, courtesy of PulseAudio.

Thanks for the memory, PulseAudio

But that’s not all!

I was in the conference call, but there were updates available on the desktop computer. I decided to see what happened when I rebooted to get the updates. (Since my laptop was on the call, it wasn’t a problem.) I restarted the desktop, and the sound automatically moved back to the laptop speakers! That was cool — I didn’t lose any of the conference.

But it got better. After updates finished and the system restarted, I logged in. The sound automatically went back to the desktop speaker system! I was really impressed.

PulseAudio can track where audio streams are going, and send them back to the original devices when restarted. I love this feature! I remember the early days of Linux audio. It seemed like every single operation was hit-or-miss. I’m glad I don’t have to mess around with the system at that level anymore. I can just concentrate on my tasks, and things Just Work(tm).

Fedora kernel engineer.

Red Hat has an immediate opening for a full-time engineer to join the kernel team in Fedora Engineering. This job will work with Josh Boyer and Justin Forbes to maintain and improve the kernel in Fedora, and participate and contribute to upstream development and testing. This job interacts with the Fedora team and community, the RHEL kernel engineering groups, and the upstream kernel community.

Ideally we’re looking for someone with significant kernel experience. We want someone who can help manage our own kernel releases. But also we want to get patches and code upstream where it can benefit the entire community, for example to improve hardware support. Red Hat’s a challenging and exciting place to work, and the Fedora team is a great bunch of people to work with. A talented, motivated kernel hacker will find plenty of opportunity here for growth and collaboration.

Applications are being accepted now. You can find more information about the job, and apply online, via the posting here on our Red Hat Jobs site.

 

Design Team FAD 2015.

I’m here in Westford over the weekend with other members of the Fedora Design Team for their Fedora activity day. I traveled up to chilly Boston on Thursday midday, so I could assist by transporting people from the airport to our hotel in Westford.

On Friday, we convened in the Red Hat office in Westford. As is usual for my Westford visits, I pretty much spent the day running from place to place taking care of things unrelated to the Design team, but which needed to be done in my role as a manager. Fortunately most of the day was spent by the team figuring out policy and processes. I don’t feel like my input was needed there, or even appropriate since I’m not a frequent contributor to design tasks — as much as I love the team! So it all worked out for the best, I think.

Today, though, I was able to contribute. One of the major task areas was to do issue triage and fix up the team’s Trac instance. That was something I was (somewhat) qualified to do. I helped the team go through all the pending tickets, closing stale tickets (no response, unclear goals, redundant, etc.).

Then, using the categories developed by the team on Friday, I helped update the parameters on the Trac instance to match. I also set up a bunch of reports on Trac to match relevant agenda items for the reboot of the Design team meetings. This way, they can call up a set of reports to follow up on tickets methodically.

I even learned some good SQL-fu thanks to my buddy Langdon White. I finally got a start shedding my misunderstanding of joins, so I can do more complicated queries. One of the results was this report, which tells the team when an issue reporter is not responsive to questions, in line with the processes the team worked up on Friday.

People tried hard to make sure the FAD was remote accessible, so if you couldn’t be here, you could still monitor or participate. It was difficult to keep some of the facilities working. For instance, this afternoon I discovered that someone had bounced us from our own room on OpenTokRTC. That made it, well, rather difficult for us to broadcast there. I hope remote attendees will understand the difficulties and be confident we tried to make this a decent remote event.

Tonight I’ll probably think about some additional reports, and then do a little personal work. Tomorrow will be some more work sprints until I start chauffeuring people to the airport after lunch. I was happy to be part of the group and to help the participants have an effective FAD.

Congratulations to the Fedora community on F21.

This release has been a long time coming. It has been about a year since F20 release, and the pause we took as a community to embark upon the first steps of Fedora.next. I know many people have been anxious for the pause to be over. Finally the day has come and gone, and the release seems to be hitting on all cylinders!

I wanted to say thanks to the whole community that contributed to Fedora 21 release. It’s impossible to name everyone who helped, and if I leave someone out it might disappoint someone. So let me just say to everyone:

AWESOME JOB!

Now go get some Fedora 21 awesomeness.

Samsung ATIV 9+ loves Fedora 21 Alpha.

Today I received my brand new laptop, a Samsung ATIV 9+ (model 940X3G-K04), and of course my first exercise was to boot it on Fedora 21 Alpha. This model has the QHD+ 3200×1800 text display with a touchscreen, and a solid state 256 GB storage device.

First steps with Samsung ATIV 9+

I downloaded the manual on another system, which I read to discover I should hold down the F2 key at power-up to get into the BIOS setup.

I inserted a USB stick with Fedora 21 Alpha installed, before starting the laptop. By the way, I published a screencast on how to make that Live stick. Then I got into BIOS setup, and used the Boot options to enable booting from the USB stick.

I decide to make a full disk image of the pristine hard disk, compress it, and send it to backup just in case. I don’t feel like keeping 20 GB of the disk reserved for a Windows operating system I’m unlikely to use. So:

dd if=/dev/sda bs=1M | gzip -c | ssh paul@192.168.0.X 'cat - > samsung-ativ-full-disk.img.gz'

I’m pretty sure this is going to tie up the laptop for longer than I’d like. On the plus side, it will give the CPU a bit of a burn-in as well. I ran through an installation after the disk copy was finished.

Booting after installation

The first hurdle was that the GRUB text screen is so small as to make it almost impossible to see for anyone over the age of 18. With the aid of a microscope I was able to find the right option to boot without testing. 😉

Note #1: If the screen is also very dim, you can visit the BIOS setting to turn off the automatic screen dimming at boot time.

The actual boot from the Live USB stick was completely uneventful. Of course systemd was super-fast. In no time at all I was in the Live session.

Applications and interface

GNOME 3.14 did an excellent job detecting the HiDPI type display. The GNOME top bar and dock were sharp and readable. The display is gorgeous, quite comparable to a Retina-model MacBook Pro.

Some apps are still suffering a bit on HiDPI, though. LibreOffice and Firefox UI elements are far too small by default. Epiphany a.k.a. GNOME Web, on the other hand, works great. This is probably because GNOME Web responds to the overall GNOME display settings for HiDPI.

Note #2: To make the Firefox interface more HiDPI-friendly, visit the about:config URL page, and change the setting for layout.css.devPixelsPerPx to 2.

The Ctrl and Fn keys are reversed from my Lenovo x220 I’ve used for the last 3.5 years. Sigh, muscle memory. But the function keys mostly seem to work (other than the Windows specific ones).

Samsung ATIV 9+ touchpad issues

After hitting Fn+F5 to test the touchpad enable/disable function on the keyboard, I found the touchpad worked erratically. It sometimes didn’t work at all, even after a cold restart of the laptop. The pointer would disappear when the Terminal application or other text entries came to the foreground. The GNOME on-screen keyboard would emerge at these times, even if I didn’t need it and wasn’t touching the screen.

GNOME hacker and Fedora buddy Ray Strode, in his usual generous style, kindly entertained my questions and found some help for me. This seemed to do the trick:

sudo modprobe -r samsung_laptop
gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.peripherals.touchpad touchpad-enabled true

Ray opined that the routine that was catching the function key to disable touchpad was, for some reason, no longer catching it to re-enable. This might have something to do with the kernel module. I plan to investigate further next time I reboot the system.

Touchscreen

This is where the enabling work in GNOME shines. A lot more systems these days have touch screens available. I love the fact that I can drag my apps around the screen with a finger as opposed to the touchpad. The standard auto-sizing targets at top, left and right all work well, so I can quickly maximize or half-size windows.

Unfortunately, the resizing handles on window sides and corners are difficult to grab accurately, which is frustrating. On HiDPI touchscreens, perhaps there’s a way to increase the size of these targets. Overall though, far more goodness than badness.

Other issues

The keyboard backlight does not work if you install in EFI mode. Presumably, I should be able to reinstall the system after turning off Secure Boot in the BIOS, and then regain this capability. I’ll probably try that over the weekend so I don’t take more time away from productive work during the week.

Overall impression

The laptop itself seems to have sturdy build quality. It’s an attractive slate/charcoal color. The shell definitely shows oil from even clean, dry hands. The glossy touchscreen of course shows even more smudging. It would be nice if Samsung included a cleaning cloth.

I already love the touchscreen and find myself using it to quickly select the Activities overview, the GNOME settings at the upper right, and to swipe the notifications area into or out of view. The display is gorgeous and very bright even at half brightness.

One of the Samsung’s primary draws is its very slim profile. Besides the power adapter port and one USB 3.0 port on each side and the ubiquitous Kensington port, there is a mini-DisplayPort, a small port for the included gig-Ethernet dongle, a mini-HDMI port, and a TRRS-compatible 3.5mm headset port.

I wish the power adapter, whose jack is very slim and concerns me as potentially fragile, was something more like Apple’s “MagSafe” power connector. I’m sure that’s patented up and down to prevent anyone having such a feature. But for klutzes like me it’s definitely a huge help.

The 8GB of RAM seem well-suited, even generous, for a productivity user like myself who occasionally dabbles in virtual machine guests or other memory-intensive applications. It might be sub par for someone who has to run a lot of such apps often. But the ATIV 9+ seems weird to buy an ultralight laptop if that’s your use case, so I think 8GB is about right.

The 256GB solid state drive is incredibly fast. It’s my first SSD and I was shocked at the difference for doing not just the installation, but post-installation updates and software additions, as well as migrating my data over GbE from my older Lenovo x220 to the Samsung. It remains to be seen how the SSD stamina works out based on my routine style of use. However, I suspect if SSD is moving into the general marketplace it’s a good match for me since I’m usually more like a general productivity or creative content user.

I would say the ATIV 9+ is the best rival for the MacBook Air or Pro that I’ve seen.

CVE-2014-7169 updates on Fedora.

CVE-2014-7169 is an additional security issue in the GNU bash shell that emerged after researchers discovered the fixes for CVE-2014-6271 did not completely solve the vulnerabilities they had identified. Fedora Magazine has a very useful story that tells you why these issues are important.

Since I already published a story on how to deal with CVE-2014-6271, I might as well do a quick followup here for my readers on how to deal with the additional vulnerability.

These instructions will allow you to quickly get packages from the Fedora Koji package build system to address both CVEs, without having to wait for them to propagate to Fedora’s worldwide mirror system.

Fedora 21 Alpha

Run these commands:

su -c "yum -y install koji"   # provide root password...
koji download-build --arch=$(uname -m) bash-4.3.25-2.fc21
su -c "yum localinstall bash-4.3.25-2.fc21.$(uname -m).rpm"   # provide root password again...

Fedora 20

Run these commands:

su -c "yum -y install koji"   # provide root password...
koji download-build --arch=$(uname -m) bash-4.2.48-2.fc20
su -c "yum localinstall bash-4.2.48-2.fc20.$(uname -m).rpm"   # provide root password again...

Fedora 19

Run these commands:

su -c "yum -y install koji"   # provide root password...
koji download-build --arch=$(uname -m) bash-4.2.48-2.fc19
su -c "yum localinstall bash-4.2.48-2.fc19.$(uname -m).rpm"   # provide root password again...

Hope this helps!

Flock Day 4.

Here’s a summary of Saturday’s activity at Flock 2014 where I participated or attended. I also have blog entries for Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3.

  • The constant stream of late nights was really getting to me. Didn’t arrive at the venue until about 9:15am. I skipped the first session and had some coffee, courtesy of Smooge.
  • Caught up on email sent overnight from people in the USA, and did final preparation for my talk.
  • I gave my session on the connection between RHEL and Fedora. I also discussed how well things went for RHEL 7 due to work in the Fedora community. I feel like it went very well. You can watch the complete video here.
  • I had an excellent conversation with Alberto Ruiz, who manages Red Hat’s desktop applications team.
  • Went with Alberto and Patrick Uiterwijk to lunch at the cafeteria. Got to know Patrick a little better, since he will soon be joining us on the Fedora Engineering team.
  • Sat in the hall with Patrick and got a Taskwarrior server running on one of my boxes.
  • Joined the session on revamping governance in Fedora, which was run by Toshio Kuratomi and Haïkel Guémar. This was hands down the best accomplishment of Flock. There will be a proposal for Board revamp coming from this session (finally!). I’m looking forward to the ensuing discussion and resulting improvements.

At this point I was finally exhausted. I headed back to the hotel early to do a little more reading and writing. I met up with some of the Anaconda team for a late dinner. Then I packed so I’d be ready in the morning to catch my flights back to the USA.

The Flock conference was excellent this year. It was nice getting back into the swing of community things. I enjoyed meeting up with everyone I saw. If I didn’t get a chance to see and talk with you personally, I’m still glad you were there. I hope you had a great time at Flock in Prague. Let’s do it again next year in the USA!

Flock Day 3.

Here’s a summary of Friday’s activity at Flock 2014 where I participated or attended. I also have blog entries for Day 1 and Day 2.

  • Didn’t make it up quite so early today, due to not turning in until about 2:30am the previous night. I got to the school basically on time, but worked on email and day job stuff for a little while.
  • Attended Matthew Miller’s joint session on Fedora.next.
  • Got lunch late, ending up at a table with Stephen Tweedie and a few others. We talked about containers and strategy.
  • Touched up my slides for Saturday, getting straight in my head how I wanted the presentation to go. Reveal.js is cool.
  • Attended Richard Hughes’ session on building an application installer. GNOME Software is a huge step in usability, and it was enlightening seeing the huge amount of work that went into this tool. I wrote an article on Fedora Magazine covering this presentation.
  • Attended Ralph Bean’s excellent workshop on making tools with fedmsg, the Fedora messaging bus built on Zeromq. We learned how to use just a few simple lines of Python to build a Twitter feed from Fedora Badges. Amazing!
  • Attended the workshop on DevAssistant. I talked with the developers to learn about their future plans and to discuss desktop integration.
  • Met up with Garrett LeSage, Chris Roberts, Matthew Miller, Haïkel Guémar, and others for a great dinner at an Italian pizzeria. It was delicious.
  • Late hangout with friends kept me up yet again too late!